• 0 Moves
    0:00 h
    0.00 km
    0 kcal
  • Greatest Moves
  • 22.1.2012
    21.8.2011
    • Running 2:30'32.3 Average heart rate 156 bpm, 21.08 km
      AFC Half Marathon, 2011. Overcast skies. Missed recording the first mile. Ran in my Vibrams, so no foot pod. I opened up for the run up the final hill.
    10.5.2011
    26.3.2011
    • Running 1:19'08.7 Average heart rate 132 bpm, 10.14 km
      Vibrams A yogi friend of mine was quite confident that mouth shut running would be better. This is not what most runners believe. So I tried an experiment yesterday. I ran on a treadmill, ramping up to 6 mph (10min./mil) and then I experimented with styles of breathing. I found that running at a constant speed (6 mph) with the mouth shut (laps 2 and 4) results in essentially the same heart rate as with the mouth open (lap 3). Each lap was about 10 minutes long (1 mi.). There was a bit of initial distress in lap 2 (heart rate spike) but running with the mouth closed brought greater awareness of the breathing and deepened it (regular in breath for 4 steps, out breath for 4 steps). With the mouth open, each step jolts the lungs a bit so the air leaks out or in and it is harder to breathe rhythmically. The body seems to have a cleaner signal to work with the mouth shut. Looking at second order effects, I did a FFT analysis of the R-R variation. Raw FFT plots with no model fitting for the three laps show much higher power (total variation in R-R data) than with the mouth closed. The y axis scales for the FFT plots are different. More than the shape, it is the total power that is more revealing -between 4 and and 10 times _greater_ with the mouth closed (while holding the speed constant). This suggests that the heart was tracking the deeper breathing. In case you are wondering, greater variation is a sign of a healthier more responsive heart. So mouth shut running has a better effect on the heart without compromising on speed! [Incidentally my heart races ahead when I start my runs, hence the initial high bump. I am not out of breath or feeling distressed. It is as though the cardio vascular system is flushing something off as it gears up for the run. I have worn multiple HRM monitors simultaneously to rule out measurement errors and it has been reported in the literature as common in "well trained" A yogi friend of mine was quite confident that mouth shut running would be better. This is not what most runners believe. So I tried an experiment yesterday. I ran on a treadmill, ramping up to 6 mph (10min./mil) and then I experimented with styles of breathing. I found that running at a constant speed (6 mph) with the mouth shut (laps 2 and 4) results in essentially the same heart rate as with the mouth open (lap 3). Each lap was about 10 minutes long (1 mi.). There was a bit of initial distress in lap 2 (heart rate spike) but running with the mouth closed brought greater awareness of the breathing and deepened it (regular in breath for 4 steps, out breath for 4 steps). With the mouth open, each step jolts the lungs a bit so the air leaks out or in and it is harder to breathe rhythmically. The body seems to have a cleaner signal to work with the mouth shut. Looking at second order effects, I did a FFT analysis of the R-R variation. Raw FFT plots with no model fitting for the three laps show much higher power (total variation in R-R data) than with the mouth closed. The y axis scales for the FFT plots are different. More than the shape, it is the total power that is more revealing -between 4 and and 10 times _greater_ with the mouth closed (while holding the speed constant). This suggests that the heart was tracking the deeper breathing. In case you are wondering, greater variation is a sign of a healthier more responsive heart. So mouth shut running has a better effect on the heart without compromising on speed! [Incidentally my heart races ahead when I start my runs, hence the initial high bump. I am not out of breath or feeling distressed. It is as though the cardio vascular system is flushing something off as it gears up for the run. I have worn multiple HRM monitors simultaneously to rule out measurement errors and it has been reported in the literature as common in "well trained"
    • Lap 4 mouth shut
      27.3.2011
      Photo by punna74
      Lap 2 mouth shut 6 mph
      27.3.2011
      Photo by punna74
      lap 3 mouth open
      27.3.2011
      Photo by punna74
  • 26.2.2011
    • 2-26-2011 5-29-36 PM
      26.2.2011
      Photo by punna74
    23.1.2011
    • Running 2:38'36.9 Average heart rate 162 bpm, 23.20 km
      Carlsbad marathon and half 2011. I ingested 3 packs of Accel Gel at roughly 4, 8 and 10 miles. Drank water every two miles and electrolytes at two stations. Managed to finish strong, I imagine on account of more carb intake.
    • Fat burn compariuson between 2010 AFC and 2011 Carlsbad 2011
      29.1.2011

      Experiments with carb loading: First beat athlete's fat burn traces on the two Half Marathon Races.

      Photo by punna74
      Carlsbad Half Marathon.
      29.1.2011

      Whistling with the heart at the Carlsbad Half: During a 20 minute segment around mile 2, I hit my highest cadence, highest speed and the lowest breathing rate. More surprisingly, I also generated a single peaked heart rate variation AR spectrum (bottom right) of the sort that appears when meditating and rarely at other times for this long

      Photo by punna74
    22.10.2010
    • Running 1:18'10.6 Average heart rate 127 bpm, 6.16 km
      Chancellor's 5K. Marks the end of my first 12 months of running with a focus on speed. Running for speed got me to up my carb intake and stay hydrated. Official time has me finishing in 26:45 compared to 29:25 a year ago on the same trail.
    10.10.2010

18 fans

  • groeneveldb
    henry_ii
    SariKooKoo
    pekkahuovinen
    JukkaHuovinen
    bradolwin
    cruzin_gramps
    Wonsllaf
    joeorsini
    ma2ac
    AdamChase
    DanielPressl
    Pmarkus
    joost
    kimber1266
    bluespottedapples
    jimstritz
    nheintzm