• 5 Move
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    135,2 km
    10700 kcal
  • Move eccezionali
  • 11.5.2019
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    4.8.2019
    • Escursionismo 13:18'36.2 Frequenza cardiaca media 113 bpm, 37,72 km
      I have this idea that a worthwhile goal is to hike up/climb all of California’s 14K peaks. I started with Mt Whitney, then did Mt Shasta, then Whitney and Whitney again, then White Mountain, and then did Whitney again last summer. Whitney is a good training ground, especially for testing the limits of acclimation (or lack of) but it’s been all too easy to keep returning to Mt Whitney instead of other 14Ks. Since doing White Mountain, I haven’t set foot on the remaining California 14Ks. An online search showed that Mt Langley should be the next hike on my list, as it’s supposed to be one of the easier 14Ks. It’s not that I’m looking for easy, but with 14Ks, you don’t want to start with the hard ones and work your way down to the easy ones. On August 3rd, I drove down to Hwy 395 and headed over to the Cottonwood Lakes Trailhead near Lone Pine for a climb up Mt Langley. That night, I managed only a couple of hours of sleep because I had spent the evening at MacDonalds in Lone Pine, on WiFi, touching up on a project at work. Although I’ve gone without much sleep before, that wasn’t the the best way to start a hike up Mt Langley, by getting so little sleep, in my car. Early morning on the 4th, I met Aaron (Adam), Issac, and Ray Ray at the trailhead at 4 AM, and off we went, bobbing headlamps in the darkness, at a fast pace. By the time we got to the first of the Cottonwood Lakes, the sun was coming out and we could see what a great area we were hiking in: trees, streams, big blue lakes, campsites, and vast open vistas too. As we worked our way towards Mt Langley over the New Army Pass trail, it was all pretty much a gradual uphill climb, which was In line with Mt Langley being an easier climb. At Long Lake, we were at around 11,000 ft and all was going well. After passing through a series of wide switchbacks, we were just over 12,000 ft and things started getting a bit sketchy, at least for me. I had left my Diamox, medicine for high altitudes, at home. Being at high altitude without Diamox or acclimation didn't do wonders for my strength and muscle control. At one point, Issac and I lost what little there was of the trail in a snowfield, and worked our way to a point where we had to scramble up and over a wall of rocks. My body’s reaction to the thin air didn’t help the scramble up the rocks. As we continued up, I slowed down even more while making my way up the trail. The trail got steeper and was all over the place as there were an abundance of tracks which could be construed as "the trail". The climb was peppered every so often with cairns. Although cairns can sometimes be misleading, had I used the cairns as landmarks, I would have fared much better. Next time on Langley, I head towards the cairns and avoid all the other false trails on the mountain. When I reached the summit, the guys were all waiting but there was enough time for a rest, which I was happy to have. While I was taking in the view, including Mt Whitney off in the distance, I thought how much the climb up from 12,000 ft was just like my first climb up Mt Whitney in 2016. On that climb and to a lesser extent on Langley, at over 12K of elevation, my mind was writing checks that my legs refused to cash. I’d think “go left”, “go straight”, or "put on the steam", and my legs would want to do something else, as if I’d had too much to drink, without the buzz. Sitting down to eat or drink was the only solution, but after some point, I’d have to do it again. That’s what high altitude does to me without Diamox or proper acclimation. The hike down from the summit turned normal once we got back below 12K. By then, the air was thicker, the thrust was downhill, and my legs obeyed my every command. As we headed back to the trailhead, I was in much better form, but it felt great to finally make it back to the car. So what made me think I wouldn’t need Diamox? I’d done the last Whitney climb without Diamox, and thought I’d conditioned myself to not need it, at least at 14K. So much for conditioning for altitude at 14K. Then again, we had three days of acclimation hikes at around 10K on that last Whitney climb, not the climb up Langley with no acclimation. I had thought the worst that could happen was to have what happened on my first Whitney climb and hadn’t happened since. It did happen, but if it happens again, it won’t be because I didn’t bring Diamox or allow enough time for acclimation.
    • 4.8.2019

      The goal - Mt Langley

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      Another view of Mt Langley

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      Mt Whitney off in the distance

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      Marty Marmot

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      Some of what we had to scramble over to get to the summit

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      Mission accomplished, back to the trailhead now

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    6.8.2019
    • Escursionismo 13:55'15.5 Frequenza cardiaca media 114 bpm, 34,14 km
      Back in May, after hearing that there wouldn’t be a yearly MSDH Mt Whitney climb this year, there was only one thing to do: I went online and looked for a Whitney permit. I managed to snag a lone permit for August 6th. As it turned out, there was a climb up Mt Langley on the 4th of August so I drove down to Lone Pine planning to do Langley and Whitney. After my adventure on Langley, I took a day off and once again, got caught up with work, from my room at the Dow Villa in Lone Pine. I got to bed late and decided I was going to start up Mt Whitney later than usual. At around 6:15 on the 6th, I took off from Whitney Portal with a somewhat light 16 pounds in my backpack. Since I was doing a solo climb, I decided to take my time and slow down enough to enjoy the trip up and down in a different way than I’d done in the past. If I happened to come across a wild rose on the trail, I would have stopped and smelled it. Given how I’ve always started from Whitney Portal in the dark and in a hurry, right away I noticed the difference. I could see things going up the mountain that I’d never see going up in the dark. Looming granite walls, the climb I’d have to make, a deer and a buck, a sage grouse, mountain sage, fish in the bigger streams, marmots, squirrels, meadows, flowers, and at some points, the peak of Whitney. Going up the mountain, it’s easy to feel insignificant against the distance and size of the mountain, at least until the top of the mountain where it’s easy to feel on top of the world. I wasn’t in a virtual race up the mountain like last year, but I still made good time to Outpost Camp, to Trailside Meadow, and then to Trail Camp. Going up the 97 switchbacks may seem endless to some people but by now, I’ve learned what to expect, before and after the cables, so the switchbacks don’t seem endless. For some reason though, they make me think of the “99 Bottles of Beer on the Wall” song. I can imagine if I had to take a big sip from a bottle of beer after each switchback, I’d never reach Trail Crest. At Trail Crest, there were resting hikers, along with Marty Marmot as is usually the case, hoping I’d feed him/her. I passed right by. The rest of the trip to the summit was as it always is, about a two mile climb with sweeping panoramic views of the lakes below and the mountains off in the distance. The trail had been clear of snow until then but as I got near the summit, I ran into a snow field and after carefully stepping my way up and through it, slipped on an icy rock, fell and cut my fingers in two spots. It wasn’t until I looked down at my left hand after feeling a sticky wetness and wondering how melted snow could be sticky, that I saw the blood. Blood isn’t just thicker than water, it’s stickier too. After signing the register at the summit and patching my fingers up with my first aid kit, I took some more pictures, headed down the mountain and made my way down to Whitney Portal. On the way down, I saw the same marmot, deer, sage grouse, and squirrels. I was happy to bid them goodbye for the moment. I hope to see them again.
    • 6.8.2019

      Heading up to Whitney Portal

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      Looking towards the summit

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      One of the numerous deer on the trail

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      Looking at what's ahead

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      Heading towards Outpost Camp

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      Beautiful Sky Pilots

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      The final push to the summit

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      On the summit

    28.9.2019
    • 28.9.2019

      Mt Olympia, higher than Mt Tam

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      Just before the steep part of the Burma Road Trail

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      The first steep hill on the Burma Road trail. This photo doesn't do justice to the steepness

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      On the Burma Road trail

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      View from Meridian Ridge Road

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      Wild Grapes on the Mitchell Canyon Road

  • 22.6.2019
    • Escursionismo 14:24'52.6 Frequenza cardiaca media 129 bpm, 71,09 km
      There are hikes and there are INCH hikes. INCH rates their hikes on a scale of 1 to 6, (there have been 7s though). The bigger the number, the harder the hike. INCH stands for Intrepid Northern California Hikers but perhaps the name should be changed to CNCH or Crazy Northern California Hikers. I’m not much of a burger eater these days, but a useful analog to INCH hikes is the Burger King Menu. An INCH 1 is a Hamburger, a 2, a Double Cheeseburger, a 3, a Whopper Junior, a 4, a Whopper, a 5, a Double Whopper, and a 6 is a Triple Stacker King. Yesterday, Steve, one of three fearless INCH hike leaders served up a Triple Stacker King of a hike, with extra bacon. The hike began at 6:59 AM at the Bear Valley Visitor’s Center at the Point Reyes National Seashore. Mihail Mihaylov, Jeff Fisher, Yipeng, Steve and I (sans Sarbinder who would show up later) did the customary INCH cheer and took off up the Woodpecker Trail. The race, if you can call it that, was on, as we branched onto to the Morgan Trail and then onto the Horse Trail for an uphill climb to the Z-Ranch Trail and onto to the Summit Trail, which took us to the top of Mt Wittenberg where I snapped the first of six requisite photos, or proof that I did the complete hike. As I arrived at the summit, Steve and Mihail were waiting, not for me, but for Jeff, with a small flask of tequila and shot glasses. This is Jeff’s 300th INCH hike so a celebration is in order. 300 hikes, I can barely imagine that against my (now) 11 hikes. Being that my hike count is below the 100 required to participate in an INCH toast (or so I’m told), I let the INCH “adults”, Jeff, Steve, Mihail, and Yiping get good and drunk while I took off. From the summit, I headed down to the Wittenberg Trail and onto the Sky Trail, where I snapped another photo where the Sky meets the Coast, and then onto the Coast trail for the next uphill climb. At that point, I had taken the lead but after hiking past the old Arch Rock and beginning the climb up, any sense that I might keep the lead vanished as Sarbinder, who came out of nowhere, appeared behind me. I let him pass and soon after, let Steve and Mihail pass. It seemed they bounded up the trail like gazelles and were out of sight before I could think goodbye. When I pulled into Wildcat Camp and watered up and out, I was alone but not for long, as Jeff and then Yipeng showed up a short time later. As the hike continued, Jeff and I hiked together while Yipeng took off. At around Pelican Lake I had to stop and patch up a nagging blister on my right heel. New shoes and the extra lift caused by inserts for Plantar Fasciitis had done the trick; my heel was near raw. As I raced to catch up I ran into the usual weekend crowd of Alamere Falls revelers and though that maybe I should hire one of them to carry a sign for me stating “Make way for the Real Hikers”, but thought better of it. After all we’re all hikers on this Lonely Planet. In time I caught up with Jeff and we breezed by the Palomarin Trailhead and up Mesa Road to the Ridge Trail, where we caught up with Yipeng. The climb up the Ridge Trail, is well, a climb and I was hoping it would finish soon. It did after about three miles when we hit the Teixeira Trail (yea, try and pronounce it). It took us to the Pablo Point Trail and then to Pablo Point, the whole point of the hike, which will go down in infinity as INCH 1181 - Pablo Point. Period. As Jeff, Yipeng and I sat down for lunch, 24 miles into the hike, I wondered what’s the point of hiking up to Pablo Point?” There’s no spectacular ocean view, no roadside attractions, no five star restaurant, just a sign telling us that Pablo Point is 900 ft away, and a meadow full of grass. There’s no there, there. I think that just might be the point, if there is one. Bt the time we were back on the Teixiera Trail, my watch had logged 25.88 miles. I consoled myself with thought of “I’ve done 16 mile hikes before, the rest of the hike will be a breeze”. I should have know better as that diabolical hike master, master hiker Steve, had planned the hike. Steve doesn’t do easy, at least when I’ve hiked with him. As Yipeng and I ran down the Teixiera Trail and then slowed to a normal pace on the Olema Valley Trail, the trees that had protected up from the warm sun vanished. As we crossed Hwy 1 and climbed up the McCurdy Trail I remembered how I had hiked up it about four years ago. That day was hot and by the time I got to the top I was ready to drop. Yesterday was better but at the top of the McCurdy I stopped three times, probably to reassure myself I could make it to the top of the trail, no to laugh at Yipeng’s comment “It's only two miles long”. Note to self: you need to train with more steep climbing in the heat….. or maybe you need to avoid steep climbs in the heat. I did manage though and soldiered on to the Bolinas Ridge Trail which luckily is beautiful shaded Redwoods at least until the Randall Trail, which luckily, I got to head down. Crossing Hwy 1, I headed onto the Randall Spur Trail and then I was onto the Oelma Valley Trail once more, until the Bolema Trail which took me to the Ridge Trail and the climb up to the Stewart Trail for a photo Op of the sign for the Firtop Summit, another requisite photo. As I branched off at the Greenpicker Trail, I saw Jeff coming off the Ridge Trail and mentioned he had to go up the Stewart to get a pic of the Fir Top sign. The Greenpicker took me to the Glen Camp Loop and Glen Camp where I filled my water bladder at close to 40 miles in. Lucky me as I had gone bone dry coming down the loop. Back on the Glen Camp Loop, I hiked down to the Glen Trail and onto the Bear Valley Trail for the final stretch. All I can say about that trail is that I’m not a big fan. Sure it’s a beautiful sylvan setting with babbling streams and cool air, but every time I’ve been down it, it’s been the end of a long hike, and it never seems to end. It did end though, after 44.17 miles, and 14:24 hours and 8,293 ft of elevation gain. If there had been one around, I might have eaten a Burger King “Triple Stacker King”, all 1,370 calories and all. Make that with extra bacon and cheese.
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    8.9.2018
    • Escursionismo 9:23'48.3 Frequenza cardiaca media 133 bpm, 53,47 km
      Last Saturday's hike was a celebration of sorts -- David A's birthday hike at Pt Reyes National Seashore. David's plan called for two waves of hikers, the 1st starting at 9 AM and going for the mileage equivalent of David's age in kilometers, 32 miles, or 51 kilometers, and a second wave starting at 11 AM, of 19 miles, or 31 kilometers. A big crowd showed up for the two hikes, including the guest of honor and leader of the 1st wave, David A, along with Giulia Hill & Milon, James Womack, Katie Kruzic & Hujo, Maya van den Heuvel, Mia Spooner, Michael Kustra, Michele Gilbert, Ralph Goldsticker -- the leader of the 2nd wave, Theresa Gan, Vicki Carter Alexander, AJ, Bjorn, Chris, Chundi, Crystal, Dwight, Ellen, Jacquelynn, Jonelle, Max, Nancy, Nohemi, Susan, Thomas, William, Yannick, and I. The 1st wave got off to a late start, at 9:30 due to traffic delays. That meant taking off at a torrid pace down the Rift Zone Trail. After close to 5 miles, we diverted onto the Olema Valley Trail and then onto the Bolema Trail for a climb up to the Lake Ranch Trail. David's original plan was to branch onto the Crystal Lake Trail but it was closed so we had to continue up and then down the Lake Ranch Trail to the Coast Trail, adding more than a mile to the hike. That meant we'd have to move even faster if we were going to catch the 2nd wave of hikers at Coast Camp for lunch. After a quick bio break at the Coast Trail junction, David directed us past the usual crowd of hikers headed to Alamere Falls, and into Wildcat Camp. After another quick break to fill up water bottles and water bladders, the group started the 7 miles to Coast Camp. Along the way to our lunch meetup with the 2nd wave of hikers, we were treated to magnificent views of the coast as we passed right by Arch Rock, or what's left of it, Kelham Beach & Sculptured Beach. Despite our torrid pace we arrived late and most of the 2nd wave hikers had already taken off. After eating lunch with the remaining 2nd wavers, we headed a short way up the Coast Trail and then continued up the Fire Lane Trail for a climb up to the Laguna Trail and then down to the Point Reyes Youth Hostel. From there we walked up a road which took us past Limantour Road and then onto the Muddy Hollow Trail. After a short hike on that trail, we branched onto the Bayview Trail for the remaining 7 miles, the 1st part being a fast uphill climb that reminded me of an INCH hike where everyone is racing to get back for the after hike party. After crossing Limantour Road again, we continued on until the Laguna Trail, and then onto the Sky Trail for a final climb that took us to the Horse Trail. David's original plan called for continuing on the Sky Trail and then climbing up to Mt Wittenberg , then down to the Bear Valley Trail and back to the Bear Valley Visitor's Center. That would have meant going way past 32 miles, so we headed down the Horse Trail instead and hiked down to where we started. After 33 miles and just a smidgen short of 5,000 ft of elevation gain at a moving speed of 3.9 mph, we were ready for the feast. The pot luck style birthday celebration had already started without us. After the long march, the array of treats were like manna from heaven. The freely flowing beer and wine was the nectar of the gods. Happy 51st David!
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  • 24.3.2018
    • Escursionismo 10:54'17.3 Frequenza cardiaca media 136 bpm, 46,75 km
      If you’re looking for a good long hike with a large amount of elevation gain, there are any number of ways to put one together in the Bay Area. Most of them involve stitching together a route over numerous trails to get to the desired gain and distance. Ideally, you’ll put together a loop that starts and ends at the same place but if you don’t mind dealing with logistical issues, you can start the hike in one place and end in another. Both the Skyline to The Sea and Ohlone Wilderness Trails, offer long hikes, a large amount of elevation gain and start and end in different places. At 7:00 AM on Saturday, March 24th, Mia Spooner, Adam Cole, Trina, and I met hike leader and Sierra Club Day Hikers meetup organizer Piotr, at Oholone College in Fremont for a hike across the Ohlone Wilderness Trail. The plan was to hike across the Mission Peak Regional Preserve, the Sunol Regional Wilderness and the Ohlone Regional Wilderness, to then part end of the Ohlone Wilderness Trail, near Del Valle Regional Park near Livermore, where Piotr and Trina had pre-positioned Trina’s car. We started the hike from Parking lot H at Ohlone College with a short stroll up Anza-Pine Road before turning onto Aquatic Way and then onto a spur trail that took us to the Peak Trail. As we climbed up the Peak Trail we had our first encounter with the many cows we would see throughout the day. The cows sat in the middle of the trail but were gracious enough to get out of our way as we passed by. That’s no bull, they really were gracious about getting out of the way. As we continued up the trail to Mission Peak, we were treated to expansive views down to Fremont, across the Bay and past the cities near the South Bay and up to the Santa Cruz Mountains. We stopped at Mission Peak but kept on going as we weren’t on the standard moonlight Mission Peak hike with a goal of hitting the peak and returning. From the peak, a steep descent down the Peak Trail took us to the Eagle Loop Trail and then onto the Ohlone Wilderness Trail before we branched onto the Laurel Canyon Trail. After a short time on that trail, we decided we were heading away from the main trail so we bushwhacked our way up a hill and back to the main trail. As it turned out, we could have stayed on the trail to the Laurel Loop Traill and connected back onto the main trail. As we trekked across the Ohlone Trail we passed verdant, pastoral hills, with occasional oak trees and seemingly endless, stunning views of hills full of springtime grasses. On the trail, there was mud and water and mud, waterless, mud, which we were usually able to avoid by going around it. Of course there were cows, quite a few of them. So many in fact that I took to thinking we were on the Moo-lone Wilderness Trail. Some would say that last comment was a bunch of Baloney Wilderness Trail. By the time we crossed Calveras Road, we were in the groove and continued down the trail to Geary Road where we stopped at about the 10 mile point for what in Sierra Club Day Hikers parlance is called a banana break. We didn’t break any bananas or bread for that matter but we did break out snacks that would get us up to our lunch break on Rose Peak, 19 miles into the hike. The trek up to Rose Peak, over much of the McCorkle Trail, was more of the same, with cows, cowpies, mud, rolling hills and expansive pastoral views, with some fog and rain thrown in, if you can call that more of the same. I don’t want to convey that it got old because it didn’t. Every bend of the trail was new, and the weather seemed to change, well, like the weather, from clear skies, to foggy, to drizzly, to darker and lighter. On Rose Peak, the high point of the trek, we stopped for a late two o’clock lunch and then continued on, with the final 10 miles taking us across Indian Creek, past Johnny’s Pond and Schlieper Rock, down to Williams Gulch and up to Rocky Ridge, past Boyd Camp, and then to a final steep descent to the Del Valle Regional Park’s parking lot and about a mile from there, to Trina’s car. All told, we’d hiked just over 29 miles with over 8,419 ft of elevation gain. Back in Fremont, Piotr broke out beers, tea, water chips and dip but most of us were shivering too much to really enjoy the treats. With sweaty clothes and a cld wind blowing down from Mission Peak, it was great to get back into a warm car and drive home.
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    24.8.2018
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    21.10.2017
    • Escursionismo 10:28'03 Frequenza cardiaca media 138 bpm, 43,19 km
      Last Thursday afternoon, I was all set to start another Grand Canyon adventure by taking BART to SFO when I received email from JetBlue informing me that my flight had been rescheduled to depart from Long Beach. Getting to Long Beach for my flight was a ridiculous thought but then a second email from Jet Blue informed me that the flight had been rescheduled to depart from Oakland. I managed to make that flight and arrived in Las Vegas sometime after 8 o’clock. By Friday evening, I was in Jacob Lake Arizona, at the Jacob Lake Inn with Ralph Goldsticker, Katie Kruzic, Hujo, Theresa Gan, Karl Marek, Susan J Putrus, Nohemi, Bjorn, and Susan S. Over dinner, some of us talked about the next day’s plan: seven would start our two day Rim to Rim to Rim (R2R2R) hike by heading to the North Rim of the Grand Canyon, and three would drive to the North Rim later in the day with a different itinerary which includes a stay at Phantom Ranch. Saturday morning, Ralph, Katie, Hujo, Nohemi, Bjorn, Susan S. and I drove in a caravan down to the North Rim and around 6:45, started a descent in the chilly morning air, down the North Kaibab Trail. It wasn’t too long before we started shedding layers of clothing. Hiking downhill at a decent pace through a long series of switchbacks warms you up quickly. The hike down the North Kaibab trail doesn’t offer the sweeping, expansive vistas that are seen coming down the South Kaibab Trail, but there’s still an eyeful of beauty in all directions on the North Kaibab. The trail hasn’t changed since last year’s R2R2R adventure but my expectations have. Last year, as I started down the North Kaibab trail, I didn’t know if I was attempting to hike down into and up out of the belly of the beast, but I did know I wasn’t on just another day hike in the Marin hills. This time around, I knew exactly what the group was getting into, including a rugged, winding, downhill hike from the North Rim and a strenuous climb up the Bright Angel Trail to the South RIm, not to mention the hike back. Along the way down to the Colorado River, we stopped for short water and bio breaks at Manzanita & Cottowood, and detoured to Ribbon Falls. The falls is probably the closest the Grand Canyon gets to looking like a tropical paradise with dense greenery fed by the falls. At Phantom Ranch, we stopped for lunch and some of us bought a glass of icy lemonade. At $3.75 a glass, the lemonade is a way to cool down after a hike from the North Rim, if only for a few minutes, and refills are only a dollar. If you buy lemonade on a R2R2R, remember to keep your glass for for a dollar lemonade when you pass through Phantom Ranch on the way back. After lunch we headed to the Colorado River and once we crossed the Silver Bridge, began the ascent up the Bright Angel Trail. The first part of the trail skirts the Colorado River and offers sweeping views of the river along with a view of millions of years of the North Rim's geological layers. Soon after hiking through a section of the Bright Angel with fine dust that feels like walking on beach sand, we began a steeper ascent up the trail. At that point, the trail is winding but still relatively direct until a series of switchbacks just before we hit the junction of the Tonto Trail. At the Indian Garden Ranger Station we stopped for a water break and continued hiking up and up through a series of seemingly endless switchbacks. After over eight hours on the trail, including a steep uphill slog at that point, most everything seems endless though. After dinner at the Maswick Lodge Food Court, we crashed out to get ready for the hike back. Sunday morning we met at the Hotel lobby at 5:50 and walked to the bus stop where we caught a shuttle to the South Kaibab Trailhead. If you’re looking for a “money shot” of the Grand Canyon, the trailhead is a good place to start, with deep, beautiful, spectacular views all the way down and across to the North Rim. As we hiked away from the trailhead, the views were just as good and got even better the closer we got to the Colorado River, with closer views of buttes and rock formations. The descent down is particularly steep but is made hikeable by a long series of switchbacks. Just like with the switchbacks o the North Kaibab Trail, there is no South Kaibab Trail without the switchbacks. As we got close to Black Bridge, a sign warned us that the bridge was closed for repairs. Seeing another hiker being let across the bridge, Hujo and I decided to try our luck getting across. While the others headed across a cliffside trail to the Silver Bridge, Hujo and I talked and then walked our way across the bridge. We met the group back at Phantom Ranch where we filled up water bladders, took bio breaks, or enjoyed dollar lemonade. The hike up the North Kaibab Trail was at a fast pace, at least up to Cottonwood where we sat for lunch. From there, the steepness of the trail slowed the ascent somewhat, as did the switchbacks that had been much easier going down the day before. Although the group arrived on the North Rim at different times, I’m sure I speak for all the group when I say that each of us arrived with our spirits lifted. We’d finished up a 2 day R2R2R, seen parts of the Canyon many may never see, and done so surrounded by visual layers of millions of years of Earth’s history.
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  • 2.4.2017
    • Escursionismo 7:07'41.1 Frequenza cardiaca media 133 bpm, 7,75 km
      Sunday morning, I got a chance to climb, not hike up a mountain, Mt. Lassen. For sure, the climb wasn’t a mystical experience - Moses ascending Mount Sinai to receive the 10 commandments, but the view at the top of the mountain was almost mystical. It’s not often that one gets to see the world from a mountain top, nor do many get the chance to see the top of Mt Shasta as I saw it, that is from the top of Mt Lassen. The climb required new tools: an ice axe, helmet, and crampons. In addition, I brought along new mountaineering hiking boots and a thick, hooded down jacket. Climbing up a mountain doesn’t come cheap. At 4:45 AM, when the climb up the mountain began, there was no light so a headlamp was necessary. Once the sun came out, the climb was interesting as much for what couldn’t be seen as what could be seen. Clouds would appear to obscure the view of the valleys and smaller peaks, and just as quickly, disappear, only to come back moments later. The sun, a cold, and at times violent wind were all part of the climb, but the crampons and the ice axe made the experience different than normal hiking. Luckily I didn’t have to use the ice axe for self arrest, that is, to keep me from sliding down the mountain after some unexpected fall or loss of footing, but I did get to use the axe to glissade down parts of the mountain on the way down. Sunday afternoon, after coming down the mountain and putting the axe aside for my trekking poles, I could have used the axe on the hike back as I stepped on a narrow part of the snowy, slippery trail with too much backpack on my back. I slipped, sliding down an incline, headed toward a rock cliff, but somehow I managed to stop from going over the edge, without the axe. That was the one time I felt afraid during the weekend. I thank the Universe that I never got a chance to see what was on the other side of that cliff. One thing I picked up on the hike to and from our base camp is that I need to work on packing even lighter than I have been. To put it the way it was recently put to me by an experienced hiker, salesperson, “On the trail you don’t need two pairs of everything. Everyone smells on the trail”. Those words seemed like genius as I was hiking to and from the base camp in snowshoes and at times, mushy snow. Every ounce counts.
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    18.6.2017
    • Escursionismo 11:18'21.4 Frequenza cardiaca media 130 bpm, 8,20 km
      After an aborted attempt at climbing up Mt. Rainer over the Memorial Day weekend, I felt the need to get back on the horse and ride again. To that end, last Friday morning, I drove five hours up north with Ashley Howitt and Marco (Marek), the organizer of our meetup on Mt. Shasta. When we got to Mt. Shasta, Ashley and I purchased annual Summit passes for $30, $5 more expensive than the one use summit pass. Marco already had a yearly pass. There were three choices for the meetup: The first, a Grade I climb up Mt Shastina, the second, a Grade II climb up the West Face Gully, and the third, a Grade III climb up Casaval Ridge. Ashely and I went for the Casaval Ridge climb, as did another climber who started at a different point than we did. The rest of the meet up group went for the Shastina and West Face climbs. On the way up to our campground at Horse Camp, Ashley and I met climbers who had tried to summit but had turned back due to 50-70 MPH winds. The forecast for Saturday was for winds to die down to 30 MPH, and for Sunday, to around 7 MPH. To get ready for the climb, on Saturday, Ashley and I went on an exploratory climb from our campground at Horse Camp, at just over 8,000 ft of elevation, up to 9,760 ft on Casaval Ridge. The climb, at just short of 2 miles round trip with 2,329 ft of elevation gain, was to figure out the best way up from our campground to Casaval Ridge and up, leaving footprints that we could follow the next day. Sunday morning, we left camp at 06:00, a little late, headed up the same route, and climbed to the same point of the previous day’s climb. From there, we headed down a short distance and then began a traverse through a bowl and up onto the West Face Gully. We had been warned by Park Rangers that the rest of the route to the top of Casaval Ridge was sketchy at best and possibly dangerous, given the upper route’s snow conditions. Although the climb up Casaval Ridge had been steep, it was also varied. The climb up the West Face was steeper and far longer, with little variance in terrain. It was a straight climb up. The climb to the top of the West Face was slow, mainly because of my slower pace but we finally reached the top. Ashley who had summited on the Casaval Ridge route 5 times, and many other times on other routes, was having misgivings about making it to the top and back in time for nightfall, especially since we had climbed without headlamps. Although I tried to convince her otherwise, at Misery Hill, Ashley decided to head back to camp. As for myself, I wasn’t going to leave the mountain without reaching the summit and by that time had borrowed a headlamp. Misery hill is another steep climb but it was nothing compared to the West Face climb which was far longer and steeper. After reaching the top of Misery Hill, there was a short downhill hike and then the climb up to the summit. That climb wasn’t hard except when I had to get past rock formations where melting snow made for a lot of postholing. I reached the summit at 14,180 ft, after just around 10 hours, not even close to record time but I was happy to have reached the top. At one point on the trip down, I had to stop and survey the terrain to figure out the best way to go. Since there’s no marked trail on the downhill and tracks in all directions, there wasn’t a clear choice from that point. I ended up making the right choice and got to Red Banks part of the mountain, where the real fun of the downhill hike began. For the downhill trek, I knew I had a secret weapon, time wise: much of the route back could be glissaded. In addition, although I’m not fast going uphill, I’m pretty fast going downhill. Although that would seem to be the obvious case, it isn’t always the case with hikers. The glissade down from Red Banks went by fast. It was a joy to glissade down especially given the snow conditions. On icy terrain, glissading can be dangerous. Excessive speed caused by icy snow conditions can leave a glissader little control, even using an ice axe as a brake. The glissade down was over slightly wet snow which at times, has the effect of piling up snow between the legs, acting as an axeless brake. Slowing down at just above Helen Lake, I had two choices: go left or to the right. I hiked to the right and after passing Helen Lake, continued glissading down Avalanche Gulch. It wasn’t long before I was close to Horse Camp shouting out for Ashley, who was quite relieved to see me, especially given the time, at around 5 PM. After breaking camp, we headed back down, filled up with water at Horse Camp, and hiked down to the trailhead at Bunny Flats and the parking lot. I learned a lot on the climb and have Ashley to thank for that. She taught me finer points of using an the ice axe, including how to use the ice axe to avoid falling down the mountain when traversing across a vertical slope, how to pace myself on an uphill climb, and how to traverse across a steep slope when going up isn’t an option. I also learned that I need to work on my aerobic capacity if I’m going to climb at faster speeds. I know how lucky I was to have made the climb with little wind and great weather conditions. The low point of the climb was on the way down when I discovered that my GPS watch had run out of juice. Luckily, it didn't run out until after I was at Red Banks. I still lost any data the watch would have collected from there. Mt. Shasta is a beautiful mountain but there’s no easy way up. It’s a steep climb on all the routes. Despite that, you can still visit it and enjoy its majesty without climbing to the top. If you elect for a climb to the summit, the view from the top is absolutely outstanding. The views on the way up are great too. As for the town of Mt. Shasta, it’s an interesting place, especially given the new age crowd that’s attracted to the spiritual qualities of the mountain. I can’t say I had a spiritual awakening on the mountain but I definitely got a buzz from making it to the top and down.
    • 25.6.2017

      Casaval Ridge

      25.6.2017

      Heading into the Bowl from Casaval Ridge

      25.6.2017

      Traversing the Bowl from Casaval Ridge to the West Face

      25.6.2017

      Climbing up the West Face past Mt Shastina

      25.6.2017

      Heading up the West Face

      25.6.2017

      View of the summit from the West Ridge

      18.6.2017

      View from the summit

      25.6.2017

      On the summit

    1.10.2017
    • Escursionismo 4:33'20.7 Frequenza cardiaca media 139 bpm, 17,71 km
      Last weekend I drove down to Bishop, CA with Grant Shepherd and Agnieszka Bar to be part of a double blind study on the prevention of Acute Mountain Sickness. Sponsored by Stanford University’s Wilderness Medicine Program, the study is to determine if Ibuprofen is as effective as Diamox (acetazolamide) in preventing High Altitude sickness. Although we weren’t paid for the study, meals and lodging were included. After driving from the Bay Area, the three of us arrived Friday evening at the University of California’s White Mountain Research Laboratory in Bishop. After eating dinner and taking our first dose of medicine, we crashed out in dorm style lodging. In the morning, after taking another dose of medicine, we drove 38 miles up to around 11,000 ft, to the Ancient Bristlecone Pine Forest in the White Mountains off of Highway 395. Once we passed the entrance to the Schulman Grove, we drove around 12.8 miles on rough, mostly unpaved road to the Patriarch Grove where we had lunch and were given our 3rd dose of medicine. While at the grove, some of the study’s participants went for short hikes and visited the Patriarch Tree, the world’s largest (known) Bristlecone Pine Tree. Although the tree is the largest Bristlecone Pine, the oldest Bristlecone Pine at over 5,067 years is in Schulman Grove. From Patriarch Grove, we drove another 9 miles, headed for the Barcroft Field Station. Since we couldn’t drive directly to the station, we parked near the station’s gate and hiked the last two miles to the station. The offroad, 2 mile hike up to the station took under an hour, much less than the 2+ hours it had taken to drive across the rocky, unpaved roads after Schulman Grove. The drive felt like the longest drive ever, given the slow speed we drove at. At one point, we stopped and let air out of the tires, in hopes of avoiding the flat tires the road is known to cause. A 4X4 would have been a much better choice than the Prius we drove in. After dinner and another dose of medicine, all 27 of the study participants gathered around to listen to a lecture given by Dr. Soto, on High Altitude sickness. The lecture covered among other topics, the ways humans react at high altitudes, the ways they can become sick, including the life threatening HAPE (High Altitude Pulmonary Edema) & HACE (High Altitude Cerebral Edema), and the less threatening but embarrassing HAFE (High Altitude Flatulence Expulsion). After the lecture, the group crashed out, or attempted to. I say attempted to because sleeping at high altitudes isn’t like sleeping at lower altitudes. Although the percentage of oxygen in the air is the same at lower and higher altitudes (21%), at higher altitudes there is less air pressure to compress the air, making the air thinner. That makes for less oxygen to breath, which in turn can make sleeping at high altitudes difficult. Many of the study participants were tossing and turning all night or were otherwise unable to sleep well, and in one case, ended up vomiting throughout the night. A lucky few had a restful sleep. People react to high altitudes in different ways. In the morning, we ate breakfast, packed lunches, and took a final dose of medicine before heading up to the Peak of White Mountain. The first part of the climb, up some switchbacks, past the station observatory and up to about 12,700 ft was relatively steep. From there, we hiked downhill through barren, treeless terrain for about a mile, and then began climbing again, through similar barren terrain, getting up to around 13,169 ft. From that initial high point, we hiked down for about 4 tenths of a mile, before starting the final climb, through a series of switchbacks, to the peak at 14,252 ft. At times, the terrain up to the peak has the look of a lunar landscape, although mountain grasses were evident during most of the climb up. The view from the peak was as expected on the third tallest peak in California, deep and magnificent with views across to the Sierra mountains and into Death Valley. The hike down was largely the same as the hike up, but in reverse, with a different view. When we reached Barcroft Station, we had hiked 11 miles and climbed over 5,000 ft. After grabbing our full packs, we hiked the two miles down to the car and headed back for the long drive home. Although we didn’t get to see the Bighorn Sheep that sometimes hug the mountain slopes, during parts of the climb up and down, we did experience the strong, cold wind the mountain is known for. Agnieszka made her first 14K summit as if she’d been climbing up for 14K peaks for years, and Grant and I got to add another 14K peak to a growing list. The climb up White Mountain is known as the easiest climb of all of California’s 14K climbs, but it’s far from an effortless, undemanding climb, especially given the altitude, the wind, and the elevation gain. If you decide to climb White Mountain, be prepared for a long slow drive in and out. Drive time can be shortened with a suitable 4X4 vehicle, but any way you cut it, it’s still a long drive but well worth the trip.
    • 1.10.2017

      White Mountain

      1.10.2017

      View of the Sierras from the Summit

      1.10.2017

      White Mountain Summit Hut

      1.10.2017

      Heading down from the summit

      1.10.2017

      View of the Sierras from the Summit

      1.10.2017

      Looking back at the peak

      1.10.2017

      The Observatory

      1.10.2017

      Barcroft Research Center

    9.10.2016
    • Escursionismo 10:36'42.1 Frequenza cardiaca media 137 bpm, 37,14 km
      We started the day by taking a bus from the Yavapai Lodge to the South Kaibab Trailhead. It was downhill from there until the Colorado River, after which we slowly began to ascend as we walked up the North Kaibab Trail. Around 11 hours after starting, we reached the trailhead of the North Kaibab Trail, and the car. It was a 4 hour back to the Circus Circus Hotel in Las Vegas. What a day! What a weekend!
    • 9.10.2016

      Morning breakfasty

      9.10.2016

      Canyon Cactus

      9.10.2016

      Looking for dinner

      9.10.2016

      Switchbacks on the South Kaibab Trail

      9.10.2016

      The South RIm of the Grand Canyon

      9.10.2016

      Looking towards the North Rim from the South Rim

      9.10.2016

      Edge effect

      9.10.2016

      Heading up the North Kaibab Trail

  • 8.10.2016
    • Escursionismo 10:35'47.2 Frequenza cardiaca media 141 bpm, 43,38 km
      We started the day at Jacob Lake where we spent the night. After a 45 minute car ride, we arrived at the North Rim and started hiking down the North Kaibab Trail. Downhill was relatively easy and we passed through CottonWood, took a detour to Ribbon Falls, continued on to Phantom Ranch, and crossed the Colorado River over a suspension bridge. Once over the bridge, it was pretty much all uphill as we ascended the Bright Angel Trail. Along the way, we ran into thunder and lightning, and some light rain. We made it to the top after around 10 1/2 hours.
    • 8.10.2016

      The North RIm of the Grand Canyon

      8.10.2016

      Tunneling down the North Kaibab Trail

      8.10.2016

      Limestone wall on the North Kaibab Trail

      8.10.2016

      Looking down the North Kaibab Trail

      8.10.2016

      Don't fall

      8.10.2016

      Rock ceiling

      8.10.2016

      Ribbon Falls

      8.10.2016

      Upper Ribbon Falls

    12.11.2016
    • Escursionismo 16:41'21.4 Frequenza cardiaca media 127 bpm, 36,08 km
      Last weekend, I drove over 8 hours for something billed by one of the Meetup groups I hike with, as “The I-m-possible Hike”, a hike from Shorty’s Well, near Furnace Creek in Death Valley to Telescope Peak, then down to Mahogany Flats, and ending at the Charcoal Kilns. From the summit of Telescope Peak, you can view the lowest point in North America, Badwater in Death Valley, to the highest point in the contiguous United States, Mt. Whitney. As is said, from the peak, you can see no further with a telescope, hence the name Telescope Peak. When I first read about the hike, the word impossible didn’t deter me, especially when I read on the net that others have made the same hike. Despite the hike organizer’s play with the letters of Impossible, the hike HAS been described as impossible, even by experienced hikers that have hiked it. Despite my eagerness to do the impossible, I drove down not knowing how I’d deal with the hike’s 11,000+ ft. of elevation gain. The most ever increasing elevation gain I’d hiked up to that point was for the Mt. Whitney climb back in July, and at just over 6,000 ft. of constant gain, that hike has a lot less elevation gain than the proposed hike. The Mt. Whitney hike is no walk in the park, although technically, it is, but lots of people have completed it. The trails up the Mountain are clearly marked and hard to mistake. The Impossible hike is different. The first 8 miles are up Hanupah Canyon Rd, a 4X4 dirt road that climbs up to around 3,000 ft. From there, until the hike hits the ridgeline at around 10,000 ft. that leads to the summit of Telescope Peak. there are no well trod trails, much less signs pointing in the right direction. You’re on your own on this hike, although it helps to have a map, a GPS app on a PDA, or a GPS watch as a friend. I ended the long drive from San Francisco,by driving to and parking my car at Charcoal Kilns where I met my hiking partner for the hike. From there, we drove in his car about an hour to Furnace Creek, had dinner at a local cafe, and went to a local campground to attempt to sleep. For the most part, I wasn’t able sleep except for an hour and a half before we left for the drive to the trailhead. We started the hike around 3:30 at the trailhead, at 262 ft. below sea level, 11 miles up the unpaved West Side Road and its intersection with Hanaupah Canyon Road. We began with headlamps on, hiking up the 4X4 Hanaupah Canyon Rd. After around 2.5 hours, the headlamps went off, and at close to 10 miles in, at around 3,500 ft. of elevation, we started a climb up a 19 degree slope, parts of which are scree. This 1st experience with scree was nothing compared to what we’d have to deal with later. On this part of the climb, if one looks carefully, footsteps of others can be seen , but for the most part, a hiker has to look up to the ridgeline and just hike in that direction. It was a steep climb to the ridgeline but once there, we could see deep views all the way down to Badwater. After a quick break for a snack, we followed the ridgeline up as it ascended, but also had some short descents. At around 7,000 ft. we hit a scree filled slope. This scree is where the real “fun” began. We had to contend with scree up until we hit the trail between Mahogany Flats and Telescope Peak, which at the point we hit it, is on a ridge line near 10,000 ft. To understand why scree is so much fun, a little about scree is in order — scree is the name for the mass of broken rock fragments that can cover the slope of a mountain. Scree is the result of rockfall, thermal stresses, mechanical and chemical weathering, topographic stresses and biotic processes. Scree includes large beds of smaller, medium, and larger sized rocks. For many reasons, you won’t find a trail blazed through the scree we walked through. The shifting, at times somewhat amorphous nature of scree along with the steep slope and the geology of the mountain, prohibits trails. Walking up a slope without a trail isn’t easy but it’s even harder on the small screen we ran into before the main ridgeline. It’s preferable to walk on larger sized scree as you can often find surer although not perfect footing on it. What makes scree so difficult when climbing up a mountain, is the slope of the mountain and the unsteady footing on scree. As scree gets smaller, footing gets more unsteady. The hike from 7000 ft to the ridgeline was on slopes with an angle of anywhere from 18 to 22 degrees. Walking on the larger scree slowed us down but as the scree got smaller, walking on it was like walking on shifting earth. Aside from the lack of sure footing, walking on scree is hard work, and any progress up the mountain is extremely slow. Walking on scree reminds me of the saying “For every step forward, I take two steps back”. Scree is frustrating, can be infuriating to some, and is very much energy draining. Walking up scree also bears a resemblance to the story of Sisyphus who was doomed to roll a boulder up a mountain, only to have the boulder roll down, after which Sisyphus would roll the boulder back up, only to have the boulder roll down, ad infinitum. At times during the climb up the scree, I felt as if I was starting the climb over with each step. Eventually, we hit the end of the scree at ridge line leading to Telescope Peak. After the climb up scree, it was a time for rejoicing for I knew that the impossible part off the hike was over. The hike would be much easier after the scree. On the ridge line are Ancient Bristlecone Pine and a clearly marked trail of switchbacks leading up to the peak. As we climbed up to the peak, I was able to get photos with a panoramic view down the mountain to Badwater. By the time we got to the top, at 11,043 ft., it was dark and chilly, and I didn’t run into too many photo ops, although I did get some. One problem I ran into is when I stopped and put on my down jacket. Unknowingly, while putting on the jacket, it brushed against my GPS watch, pausing it. It wasn’t until after we had hiked to the summit and started hiking down that I realized what had happened and set the watch straight. The walk down to Mahogany flats was in the dark, with headlamps. We moved quickly, also aided by the light from what would later turn into a supermoon, two days later. At Mahogany Flats we met a fellow hiker who started later but didn’t take the scree filled route. We ended up at Charcoal Kilns, in the dark, 17+ hours after we started, with over 11,000 ft of elevation gain and over 24 miles hiked. Like the Whitney climb in July, while I was hiking up the mountain, I couldn’t see ever doing the hike again, especially if it means repeating the trudge up the slope with the smaller sized scree. Now that the hike is over, in the comfort of my home, I ask myself if I’d do it again. The answer? A resounding yes! Just like the Whitney climb, I want to do it again so I can do it better and faster.
    • 12.11.2016

      The scree just about had me screaming. The degree of ascent was 21.8.

      12.11.2016

      Sunset view from the top

      12.11.2016

      On top of the mountain. The prize -- a USGS marker

      12.11.2016

      Bristlecone Pines

      12.11.2016

      Looking down from the mountain

      12.11.2016

      Cactus cluster

      12.11.2016

      The first steep climb -- at an 18.8 degree angle

      12.11.2016

      At Shorty's Well 03:30

    12.7.2016
    • Escursionismo 14:23'46.8 Frequenza cardiaca media 121 bpm, 34,63 km
      This was my first Alpine hike. I couldn't have asked for a better introduction to Alpine hiking. The day started with a 2 AM wakeup, a quick shower and breakfast and then meeting Ralph, Milon, and Yannick for the 1/2 hour drive up to Whitney Portal. We started the hike around 3:40 at about 8,400 ft, in darkness, with our headlamps on. We missed a lot of the beauty of the trail for the 1st two hours but discovered it later, on the trip down. That initial part of the hike seemed easy, despite the darkness. By the time we reached Trail Camp, at around 12,000 ft. the sun was starting to come up. Around there, I noticed that my body wasn't behaving as it usually does in lower altitudes, a feeling that only intensified on the hike up the 99 switchbacks section of the hike. Those seemingly unending switchbacks, along with the ever thinning air as we climbed higher and higher up to the 13,700 ft elevation at Trail Crest, would appear to be the hardest part of the hike. They weren't. The view at Trail Crest is fantastic, with a spectacular vista that includes the Hitchcock Lakes and a wall of mountains that obscures much of Sequoia National Park, which we were now in. The hike from Trail Crest to the summit was the hardest part of the hike, due to the technical nature of the trail but more so because my body wasn’t always listening to what my brain commanded it to do. The lack of air caused some loss of coordination, making the hike to the summit more difficult. The decreased air does make a difference. At the summit, I met up with the rest of the group who arrived before me. Despite reaching the summit, the hike was only half over. There are no cabs or busses at the ready for those wanting to opt out. There's really only one choice at the summit, to hike down. After a 1/2 hour wait, we started our return. Even though we were heading downhill, the return was no walk in the park, although technically, it was. There was still the lessened atmosphere to deal with, and the tiredness brought on during the 1st half of the hike. Over 14 hours after we started, we finished the hike at Whitney Portal, tired but happy to be done. This was the hardest hike I've ever been on, so I have to ask myself, would I do it again? Yes! The hike up Mt. Whitney is rewarding in many ways, if only as a test of one’s ability to do something physically and mentally challenging. It also provides great and varying scenery, if done in a group, a sense of camaraderie that isn’t available elsewhere, and to top it all off, a sense of accomplishment that tops the more mundane activities of one's life.
    • 12.7.2016

      Another view from the switchbacks

      12.7.2016

      Heading up one of the 99 switchbacks

      12.7.2016

      On top of the mountain

      12.7.2016

      View from the Trail Crest including the Hitchcock Lakes.

      12.7.2016

      Early morning view of sunrise

      12.7.2016

      Heading up the mountain

      12.7.2016

      hiking down from the summit, crossing a snow bridge

      12.7.2016

      On top yet only halfway done

    13.4.2016
    • Escursionismo 8:21'30 Frequenza cardiaca media 136 bpm, 40,37 km
      This hike makes three times that I've hiked the Willow Camp Trail and the Collier Springs trail, and the first time I've hiked them both on the same hike. Both trails are quite steep so they were quite a workout, although not as much as in the past. The hike started at Mt Home. From there I took the road headed to Camp Alice Eastwood, turned onto the Troop 80 trail, and then branched off on the TCC trail. I hiked it to the Dipsea trail and took it all the way to Stinson Beach. After buying a Cafe Latte, I headed towards Willow Camp trail, hiking it to Ridgecrest Blvd, and then down to Laurel Dell. From there, I hiked down the Cataract trail, to the Helen Markt trail, then the Kent trail, followed by the Alpine Bon Tempe Pump Road, the Shadyside trail and into into the Lagunitas Picnic Area. After a quick bite to eat, I headed down the Rock Springs Road, to Lake Lagunitas Road, and hiked both legs of the Collier Springs trail to the end at at the International Trail. From there it was onto Ridgecrest Blvd for a short distance, then onto the Lakeview Trail, branching off it to visit the Mid Peak of Mt Tam. From there I hiked the Mid Peak Road, crossed Ridgecrest Blvd again and hiked up to the East Peak. After coming down from the East Peak, it was down the Eldridge Grade to a steep, unmarked shortcut trail that took me to another part of the Eldridge Grade. From there I made my way to the Wheeler Trail, hiked it to the Hoo Koo-E-Koo Road, followed it to old Redwood Grade, and hiked it back to the car at Mt Home. It was a long hike on a beautiful day.
    • 13.4.2016

      If you look closely, you can see the East Peak in this picture of the Mid Peak of Mt Tamalpais

      13.4.2016

      The signpost tells you what's coming

      13.4.2016

      Collier Springs Trail on the up and up. Like Willow Camp Trail, it's much steeper than it looks.

      13.4.2016

      On the TCC Trail

      13.4.2016

      View from the Dipsea Trail

      13.4.2016

      Alpine Lake through the trees

      13.4.2016

      East Peak of Mt. Tamalpais

      13.4.2016

      Poppies on Willow Camp Trail

  • 12.6.2015
    • Escursionismo 6:47'04.6 Frequenza cardiaca media 135 bpm, 29,95 km
      This hike up Grasshopper Mountain in Humboldt Couty was the highest elevation Cynthia and I have ever climbed, at about 3,376 ft. We made the mistake of climbing without enough water so by the time we reached the peak, we were all out. Luckily, we found a pipe and faucet at the Ranger lookout and were able to replenish our supply. We were wary of the water as it wasn't labeled potable and had some particulate matter in it, but we were too damn thirsty to worry too much. When we got back, it was well past dark and once we got off the trail, we had to walk about half a mile up the road to the car. Luckily, my sense of direction was in order and we were walking in the right direction. It was a great hike, but we were tired and sore at the end.
    • 12.6.2015

      View From Grasshopper Mountain

      12.6.2015

      Going down Grasshopper Mountain

      12.6.2015

      The top of Grasshopper Mountain

      12.6.2015

      Young grasshopper

    22.3.2015
    • Escursionismo 6:25'39.9 Frequenza cardiaca media 142 bpm, 34,44 km
    23.11.2014
    • Escursionismo 4:34'45.9 Frequenza cardiaca media 140 bpm, 22,74 km
      This was my third hike on the Sky Trail, my first solo hike on the trail, and my 1st hike with a heartbeat monitor. I didn't start until about 12:00 and thinking I'd end up hiking after dark if I didn't push it, I really picked up the pace. Once I got back Cynthia pointed out that my max heart rate BPM was probably too high for my age group. Despite that, although going up Sky Trail is no walk in the park, I never felt like I was at my limit. Nevertheless, I need to find out how absolute the max numbers for my age group are.
    • 23.11.2014
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